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, the first african-american admitted to the university of mississippi in september 1962. this is about 60 meant -- 40 minutes. >> thank you, ralph, john. my gratitude to lover of congress for hosting the event. i will try to put into 30 minutes with happened to me 50 years yo was a reflection. this is my tenth but event says the book was published in september, and each event is different, its audience is different to me to the questions a different. i was a 23-year-old r.o.t.c. second lieutenant from a small liberal arts college in minnesota sent down to mississippi to -- along with 15 or 19,000 other federal soldiers to quell the riot, put down a riot. i was not aware what we are doing in order going because the county administration had put a clamp on public disclosure. not until we get too many since world -- memphis where we wear our mission. it was such a delicate, uncomfortable effort by our u.s. military, and it was a military -- often times a say was an army out of place. it was not our mission. military police said that mission sometimes, but they occurred every hundred years or
-american admitted to the university of mississippi in september of 1962. this is about 40 minutes. >> thank you ralph and john andd mmy gratitude to the library ot congresshe for hosting the even. i will try to put into 30 whnutes what happened to me 50 years ago with some reflection.h this is my tentative book event since the book was published in september and each event is different and each audience is different and your questions are different. i was a 233-year-old arra tc second lieutenant from a small liberal arts college in minnesota, sat down to mississippi along with 15 or 19,000 other soldiers to quell the right to put down the right. i was not aware of where we were going because the kennedy administration that put a clamp on public disclosure. it's not until we got to memphis that we were aware of our mission. it was such a delicate, uncomfortable effort. u.s. military and it was a military oftentimes i say i'm army out of place. the military police had the mission sometimes to put down domestic disturbances that they occurred once every 100 years assumptive to that effect, clearl
, was the chairman of the mississippi freedom democratic party,, at a critical moment, ad he has never stopped keeping on, keeping on. let's talk about the past or let's talk about what do we do next? >> let's go to questions. we have a microphone. yes, sir? >> seems in retrospect the kind of eulogy for american liberalism, like an age that may never return, like looking at a -- the last shining of the sun before a period of decades of darkness. don't mean to be mellow dramatic here. you have not mentioned the word vietnam, and i'm always wondering, could american history have taken a different path that we wouldn't have come to the place we are today? >> why did you abandon my script and wing it? how could i forget about vietnam. my piece -- my thought on vietnam -- [inaudible conversations] s -- my thought on vietnam is that lyndon johnson, so to speak, was trapped from day one. when johnson became president, we were losing, change of government every couple of weeks. johnson, as you -- we were going to play a telephone conversation between johnson and richard rusk, the head of the armed ser
country along the mississippi where they used to drive the log is in the old lumbering days and the trails where the pioneers came north, saw some good bass jumping in the river. i never knew anything about the upper mississippi before and it is really a very beautiful country and there are plenty of pheasants and ducks in the fall but not as many as in idaho and i hope we will both be back there shortly and can joke about our hospital experiences together. best always to you, old timer, from your good friend who misses you very much, mr. popov. ps, best to all the family. and feeling fine and very careful about things in general and hope to see you very soon. poppa. no one knows for sure, but these seem to be the last real sentences ernest hemingway set down on paper amid so much ruin, still a beauty. thank you very much. [applause] >> robert richardson is next from the 30th annual literary seminar in florida. he has written on henry david thoreau, william james and ralph waldo emerson delivered a speech titled in search of lost time, biography and fiction. "in search of lost time: biogra
movement in mississippi. a gentle philosophical character, he essentially the father of freedom summer, a very moral character, ultimately had a break down and then has since in the past ten years revived to a new career. c-span: where? >> guest: all of the country, teaching eighth graders how to do first-year algebra, which he says is the dividing line between where you have a chance in life or not much like the right to vote was in mississippi in the 60's. c-span: fred shuttle's worth. >> guest: firebrand birmingham preacher who personalized the duel with bill konar, the lieutenant invited dr. king to birmingham for the climactic showdown of 63. c-span: who was bull konar? >> guest: the police chief in the director of public safety and birmingham who kind of personified segregation in birmingham, the city allows most like k-town in south africa. c-span: and john lewis. >> guest: john lewis, young man grew up stuttering, preaching to chickens in rural alabama, went to college in ashbel, became a screen writer on one of the shock troops and the most devoted of king's followers on the s
overincarceration, it is of tremendous value. we have states as red as mississippi and texas, going out and enacting reforms to into the house and foreign to those in a mississippi, and acted laws and expanded a parole eligibility, placing parole restriction on nonviolent offenders. to act as if you're serving a nonviolent offense, you can be eligible for parole after serving 25% of your sentence rather than 85% of your sins. those were projected to save the state $450 million between 2008-2012, and reduce its prison population growth by a very significant percentage. since 2008, mississippi's crime rate has fallen to its lowest level since 1984. kentucky is another state, enacted a law in 2011, and instituted probation for drug possession, reduced sentences for drug crimes and expanded parole eligibility. that reform is projected to save the state $422 million by 2020, and reduce its prison population growth by almost 19%. in 2011, ohio enacted a law that eliminated the crack again sentencing disparity. passed a series of measures to these reforms were so but unthinkable when i was litigating cases
of campaign to end overincarceration it is of tremendous value. we have states kind of as red as mississippi and texas, can going out to enact reforms but in 2004 and 2008 mississippi, for example, enacted laws that expand a parole eligibility and a limited their truth in sentencing law, placing parole restrictions on nonviolent offenders. they said you're serving a nonviolent offense you can be eligible for parole after serving 25% of your sense rather than 85% of your sins. those reform projected to save the state about $450 million between 2008-2012 and reduce its prison population growth by a very significant percentage. since 2008 mississippi's crime rate has fallen to its lowest level since 1984. kentucky is another state enacted a law that a limited pretrial attention for many drug offenses including marijuana possession, and instituted probation for drug possession have reduced sentences for -- that reform is projected to save the state $422 million by 2020 and reduce its prison population growth by almost 19%. in ohio, in 2011, ohio and acted a lot about a limited crack cocaine sent
. if you look at the con fliens of great water, the mississippi river, the states of florida, the yuck tan channel. you look at the biodiversity as well as mexico you look at the challenges between what i would call the interaction of the natural world and the manmade world. it's an important part of the world but a very complex part of the world when you bring in the economic and public infrastructure down there. what you get as we an increasing population and expansion that supports that population. you have increasing interaction with the natural environment. greater doge of complexity, we start to introduce concepts like climate change and conditions of uncertainty, the level of the types of events that can occur there in terms of the order of magnitude and the consequences grows. we know the frequency is increasing. and today we're going talk a little bit about the unique area of the world from a couple of different perspectives. i would like do you think about a couple of things as we do that. the first is overriding concept of resiliency. several months ago they produced a national
this country. mohamed ali. >> guest: if i was going to play for democracia would have done it in mississippi and alabama. i didn't have to go 10,000 miles to fight for democracy. >> host: did you ever think about going down there because you talk about -- >> guest: i came very close and in the run-up to the mississippi summer project in 1964 i went to new orleans. i met with bob moses and other people there. i thought very seriously and probably if it hadn't been for the financing. they wanted people to bring their own money to bail themselves out and other things. i worked my way through school. i needed a job in order to go finish college. >> host: talk about that period. you mentioned sncc and then there was dr. king's organization, the clc. what were their respective missions? what was the overall mission of the movement? was it to get a quality was the big word. was it to get voting rights and civil rights and what else did they want and how were their approach is different from each other? >> guest: i think both thought in terms of her freedom struggle. i think in some ways we mislead
and down the coast from savannah down to florida and so he finally went back over to the mississippi but at the time, he was asked to look for the atlanta constitution to the she was given a crash course in how to load a rifle. the last week he was in the army so he could get rid of that. he would get involved in the exciting and dangerous event and a community and at that time there was no legitimacy and the political system. it was shot at the absolute corruption every county had sufficed and supported and protected. it happened in the county as well and so he founded the ongoing crimes as well as those already mentioned and other things like bribery, and he would investigate and find people would get information and certify that the information was accurate and proven in court and he would bring it in the public so vividly that the law enforcement officials at the state level or somewhere would have to do something about it and when he got to the atlanta she had the whole state that was kind of a target and was the most horrible thing going on to hurt the people of georgia and was
freedom ring from every hill in mississippi. >> from every mountainside, let freedom ring. stannic and when this happens, when we allow freedom to ring from every village, every hamlet, every state and every city. >> we will be able to speed up that day when all of god's children, black men, white men, jews and gentiles, protestants, catholics will be able to join hands and sing in the words of old negro spiritual. >> free at last! free at last! thank god almighty, we are free at last! [applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ with ♪ ♪ we are free, free at last ♪ we are free ♪ free at last ♪ ♪ ♪ [cheering] >> live pictures this afternoon at the lincoln memorial as we continue bringing shots from around the nation's capital on this inaugural weekend. fifth grade students from watkins elementary school on the national mall in washington giving the annual reading of dr. martin luther king i have a dream speech from august of 1963 kuran washington fifth. now to the white house where the crews have been working on audience bleachers and the reviewing stand in front of
on the mississippi river has been reduced and may stop in areas where drought has left water levels too low for safe passage. the american waterways operators and the waterways council estimate that $7 billion worth of commodities are supposed to ship on the mississippi in december and january alone. so an interruption would be a considerable economic effect. the u.s. army corps of engineers has been a $10 million project to prevent the shutdown. the other option would be to release water from the missouri river, but that would just be drawing down water supplies in up-river states that are already suffering from drought themselves, like montana and nebraska and north dakota. water is also essential for power generation. according to the united states geological survey, power plants account for nearly half of the daily water withdrawn in the u.s. drought and heat go hand in hand to push power plant towards shutdown. a 2008 drought put several power plants in the southeast within days or weeks of shutting down. texas, california, and the midwest now face a similar challenge with drought, stressing th
is asserting the right of the president of the united states to order the governor of mississippi and to restore order in a perilous situation, meredith is in danger of his life. parenthood, james meredith has been inspired to register for the university of mississippi when he heard president kennedy's inaugural address. so there's so much history in the air before playing the tape, tom leaned over and said i wish we could hear the chicken. the previous phone call, they're still talking about civil rights but their politician. governor barnett, at the end of a pretty intense call, said thank you for which it of our poultry program the president today, he stifles a laugh because he can't believe that this blowhard has just mentioned the poultry program. in the conversation we heard, they're not being polite anymore. they are not dancing around. they're going right into the. and the president is saying you have to do this. >> i should add a story. you know, in the south at that time governor barnett was sort of known as a bit of a dim bulb. [laughter] and two years before, during th
. finally he went back over to the lexicon of mississippi. but at the time he was asked to work for the atlanta constitution. you never get back to mississippi, but he stayed. that is how he first got here. and he was given a crash course in how so loaded should a rifle. the last week he was in the army to so they could get rid of him. so -- but he would get involved in the most exciting and dangerous events in the community. and at that time there was practically no legitimacy in the georgia political system. it was shot through with absolute corruption. it was when most of georgia was so-called wet. so-called dry. you could not buy liquor in most of the counties, but every county had plentiful liquor supplies. the sheriff and of his deputies and so forth supported and protected the liquor dealers. we had that in my county as well. jack will find out about these ongoing crimes as well as prostitution and other things like bribery. he would investigate and find out a few people that would give him information, and he would certify that the information was accurate and provable i
in their backyard and that's what's been happening. a woman in southern mississippi got 84 months in federal prison without parole for putting clean dirt on her own land. >> senator, when you talk to your colleagues about these incidents, what do you hear? >> some are horrified, about eight to sign onto a cosponsor to fix it. the other 92, not sure what they're thinking about. .. we're in danger of becoming a dinosaur if we dpobt figure what people want west coast, new england, great lakes they are sold blue. we're not going win den as a party. >> what do you think they. the. >> they are conservative they think we should balance our bucket we don't think we should be at war all the time. i think
to read mississippi, west virginia, kentucky alabama and south carolina. when i first looked at this i was thinking this has to have something to do with being in the southeastern athletic conference, the ncaa. it was my hypophysis. i am not sure. we see california, new york a fraction of that rate at which they are exporting the guns used in crime. when you do the regression analysis to see which of these are most important, you find the most powerful deterrent to exporting the crime guns is to having this discretionary permit to purchase system. but even having a nondiscretionary permitting process where you actually have to show up at a law enforcement agency reduce export rates by 55%, statistically significant, and importantly for the policies that we are talking about now being considered as private sales regulations reduced version across the state lines by 30%, and by similar magnitude, the theft and false reporting while also decrease exporting of crime guns. something we have not talked about is the bands of what some people would call junk bonds these are inexpensive poorly
name. my brother a few weeks before he was assassinated got a chance to travel with him to mississippi because at that time daddy was looking to do a campaign and was doing a little recruiting in the south. so he got to spend that time which him doing the work that he did. so it was very traumatic for all of us in this way because i remember i a bad walk into his arms, she would take me out and say we are going to pay the kissing game. i'm happy daddy's home and he said okay where is -- she called them shorter spots. where is mom's sugar spots. where's martin, where's dexter to date i remember my spot being on the forehead. my mother seems to remember it being on the cheek. but i did the game, okay? so i remember the forehead. [laughter] how did your mother's life changed? >> get changed drastically. my mother worked side by side with my father's movement and in fact before she met daddy she prepares for that when they met and she had to wrestle but her real sense of mission to want to change the condition that we had to live under and daddy did, too said she decided to surrender and a
it in mississippi and alabama. i wouldn't trigger 10,000 miles to vote for democracy. >> host: did you ever think about going down there? >> guest: i come very close in the project of 1964i went to new orleans and i met with bob moses and other people there and i fought very seriously. and probably if it hadn't been for the financing that they wanted people to bring their own money to bear themselves out and other things -- i worked my way through school, so i needed a job in order to go to finish college. >> host: talk about the period you mentioned sncc then there was dr. king's organization, would sclc. what was the overall mission of the movement? was a to get equal the is a big word or to get voting rights, civil rights, what else did they want and how were their approach is different from each other? >> guest: both of them thought in terms of the breeding rating and we mislead ourselves when we hear this term civil rights movement because if that had been the goal from 1965 the civil rights agenda had been achieved would have the civil rights act of 1964, the voting rights act of 1965 so th
. >> host: did you think about it? >> i came very close. in the run up to the mississippi project i went to new orleans and other people there and fought seriously probably if not for the financing to bring there own money to bail themselves out, i worked my way through school. i needed a job to finish college. >> host: talk about that. you mentioned snic and dr. king organization was the overall mission? the voting rights? double rights? how was the approach different? >> both started with freedom. in some ways we mislead ourselves with the civil-rights movement. if that was the goal of 1965 the agenda was achieved. 64, the active 65, if that was the goal, margin is 13 could retire and go to of college to be that campus minister in carmichael said i could achieve my goal because all of us saw the goal as much more radical. economic change, empower the black community or the black power movement, using the rights that were gained to bring about concrete we saw in 1965 as the beginning now we have basic human rights but what will you do? now the community is 100 years behind you cannot sa
wonderful for sleeping the country was beautiful around here in mississippi used to drive the blogs in the old lumber days and the trail where the pioneers came north saw some good bass jumping in the river. i never knew anything about the upper mississippi before, and it is really a very beautiful country and setting the ducks in the fall but not as many as idaho and i hope that we will be back shortly and can joke about our hospital experiences together. best always to you, old timer, from your good friend who misses you very much. p.s., best to all of the family. feeling fine and very cheerful about things in general and hope to see you all soon. no one knows for sure but these seem to be the last real sentences. it was still the duty. thank you very much. [applause] of the stragglers of world war ii in the pacific. mr. smith you look at six different pows in the theater. >> i felt that it was a venture to talk about both sides of the progress. as the mexico when , along with these gentlemen held, and where were they held? >> the americans were held for the duration of the war tr
and public health specialists working with state university and ngos state of mississippi to introduce iranian styled rural health care delivery into medically underserved parts of the mississippi delta. the islamic republic is also greatly expanded educational opportunities with letter series and basically eliminating gender disparity in educational access. one facet of progress that remained almost completely unappreciated in the last is the way for access to higher education is altering the status of iranian women. while the islamic republic places restrictions on women, that westerners would consider unacceptable in their own societies. the majority of university students are now female. the majority of students in the best universities are now female. the majority of medical students in iran are now female and women's presence is increasingly felt across an array of academic and professional discipline. now notwithstanding these comic republic staying power, foreign policy pundits here who in many cases have no direct connection to on the ground reality in siberian and a cadre of
as mississippi and texas kind of going out to enact reforms. in 2004 and 2008, mississippi, for example, enacted laws that expanded parole eligibility and eliminated their truth in sentencing law placing parole restrictions on nonviolent offenders. they actually said if you're serving a nonviolent offense, you can be eligible for parole after serving 25 president of your -- 25% of your sentence rather than 85 president of your sentence. those were projected to save the state $450 million between 2008 and 2012 and reduce its prison population growth by a very significant percentage. since 2008 mississippi's crime rate has fallen to it lowest level since 1984. kentucky is another state enacted a law in 2011 that eliminated pretrial detention for many drug offenses including marijuana possession. and instituted probation for drug possession, reduced sentences for drug crimes and expanded parole eligibility. that reform is projected to save the state $422 million by 2020 and reduce its prison population growth by almost 19%. in ohio in 2011, ohio enacted a law that eliminated the crack cocaine sente
and i took our first family vacation to georgia lee that, illinois, which is a koa koa city mississippi town. i found a rare book shelf and found a book full of newspaper. it was april 21st, 1865 "new york times" i was reading the about the lincoln's csh that triggered an intense passion for history i had never had. for the next five years it became a journey of meticulous of collecting of newspaper. i'm tucked away in the midwest. i don't have convenient ak is eases to a lot of the wonderful archives on the east coast. i don't have access a lot of the originals that are found in the library and institution across the country. i made a point to collect them. much like my other historical collectible. they are available for sale or purchase. if any has seen "american pickers" i would say it's like that. i would say i'm like that more along the license of historic documents and newspaper. i'm traversing the earth trying to find and locate and take newspapers out of rare book shops and european book dealers and people dishoiferred them in at dicks and behind balls of old homes. it's an exc
. >> guest: if i was going to fight for democracy, i would've done it in mississippi and alabama. i didn't have to get 10,000 miles to fight for democracy. >> host: did you ever think about going there? >> guest: i came very close in the run-up to the project of 1964. i went to new orleans. i met with chavez is another people there. i thought very seriously. probably if it hadn't been for the financing of that, but they wanted to bring their own money to bury themselves out and i needed to work my way through school. an easy job to finish college. >> host: you mentioned it. then there was dr. king's organization sclc. what were their respective missions? was the overall mission of the move? was it to get equality? got a nice, civil rights, what else do they want? >> guest: both of them that in turn by the freedom's journal. sometimes the ice lead ourselves when we use the term civil rights movement. in 1965 the civil rights agenda had been achieved. the civil rights act of 1964 from the voting rights act of 1965. so rather than the gold. martin luther king would've said that going to ret
in the state of mississippi to introduce iranian-style rural health care delivery into medically-underserved parts of the mississippi delta. the islamic republic is also greatly -- has also greatly expanded educational opportunities, vastly increasing literacy rates in iran and, according to the world bank, basically eliminating gender disparities in the educational access. one facet of women's progress in iran that remains almost completely unappreciated in the west is the way that access to higher education is altering the status of iranian women. while the islamic republic places restrictions on women, say in matters of dress, for example, that westerners would consider up acceptable in their own societies, the majority of university students in iran are now female, the majority of students in the best universities in iran are now female, the majority of medical students in rapp -- in iran are now female, and women's presence is increasingly felt across an array of academic and professional disciplines. now, notwithstanding the islamic republic's staying power, foreign policy
and congress were controlled by democrats from the south and who were racist. he's in mississippi and -- they were the people who controlled the jew judiciary committee and everything that happened and they controlled judicial appointment. kennedy didn't want to offend them. instead of a friendly reception they thought they would. they would be listened to but the administration would try to -- they would take their recommendations and try to incorporate them later on in legislation the civil rights movement forced them to. until the civil rights movement forced them to. they would be blight and say and write notes back and forth to themselves these people think they're going to do this. we're not going this. they found out and tried to cooperate with the administration. they found out that the independence that was put in to the law when they were set up, which made them independent voice of civil rights was really important. and they shouldn't try to, friendly with some particular administration. their job was to be a watchdog, as -- be a watchdog over what the administration wa
operation founder bellmon run by an agent named dennis aiken who was originally from mississippi and he had this investigation that resulted in the conviction. >> the city will never get people to convict him. he had 67% of the voters thinking that he had done a good job even though they got he was guilty and when but he was sentenced in jail, they talked about how she was to people, dr. jekyll and mr. hyde. what he was convicted of is racketeering conspiracy but not actually being physically involved in any of the underlining acts. and he kind of frame it. he became a boss that was able to stay directly out of the line but he knew everything that was going on. she was the kind of guy that said how many rolls of toilet paper there were in the city hall. but he really didn't. so that was the defense but he didn't play out with the journey and he went to prison and relinquished his famous to pay, what he called his dead squirrel. he did his time and went out on talk radio to lead providence has changed a lot to be more like a queen to uncle you have a round of holidays but most of the people
to galena illinois which is a cozy mississippi river town where on the main strip they there, we discovered a rare book shop. in that rare shop i found a nondescript container full of old newspapers. i picked one up and started reading it and with the april 21, 1865 "new york times." is reading about abraham lincoln and the reward for the capture of the conspirator. that moment triggered in me an intense passion and enthusiasm for history that i seriously had never had. so for the next five years, it became this journey of meticulous kind of collecting of newspapers because i am from the midwest. i don't have convenient access to the wonderful archives on the east coast. i don't have access to a lot of the original found in the libraries and institutions across the country and so i made it a point to try to collect these because much like any other historical collectible they are available for purchase so if any of you have ever seen american pickers on the history channel i would say it's much like that. i would equate myself to a american pickers but more long the line of historic documen
years in terms of rebuilding. we have seen that in louisiana and mississippi. we are still in mississippi, we're still working with the state to provide assistance to homeowners that are still rehabilitating their home. so we cannot wait really any longer to start -- >> is it fair to say a delayed recovery is a failed recovery speak with a delayed recovery is a failed recovery. recovery that doesn't allow for communities to plan for the range of means, understanding that it may take five to 10 years to recover, we would also say it is failed. >> administrator, taking off from the secretary's comments about the regional economy within the complex -- transportation is a critical element, is it not, if getting people to work, getting a workforce to their job, being able to great productivity, being able to drive a better bottom line, being able to move an economy? i think sometimes we think maybe another part of the country, transportation and particularly transit, in some types of luxury. but isn't it a necessity to economic success? >> it absolutely is, mr. chairman, but now
was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so, states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california and arizona, north carolina, are all being transformed in the post world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. this real -- this period from 1964 to 2008 could be thought of as kind of the period of the sun belt dominance in american presidential history. you think about every president elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from a state of the sun belt, lyndon johnson, texas. richmond nixon, california. gerald ford, was not elected. so he doesn't count. he was from michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. the first george bush from texas via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. so 2008 in some ways watershed election. ends the 40-year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative cast to them. tended to be
's been happening. a woman in southern mississippi got 84 months in federal prison without parole for putting clean dirt on her own land. >> host: senator, when you talk to your colleagues about these incidents, what do you hear? >> guest: some are horrified. about eight of them, who signed on and cosponsored my bill to try to fix it, the other 92 i'm not sure what they're thinking about. but when you tell the american people how the government's harassing, abusing and even imprisoning people for selling raw milk, you can go to an amish farmer, some of these amish farmers have been arrested and threatened with jail because they're selling mil to their neighbors -- milk to their neighbors. >> host: senator paul, will you be taking these issues nationwide? >> guest: we're going to be talking about it everywhere anybody will listen because we think government has gotten out of control, government's run amok, and government's become a bully, and someone's got to stand up to a bully. >> host: november 2012, postelection, what did the 2012 elections clarify for you? >> guest: boy, that
by democrats to or from the south and who were racist. and mississippi and someone, mcclellan, they were the people to control the judiciary committee and everything that happened, and the control judicial appointments. so instead of the friendly reception that they thought they would get they did not listen to be the administration -- and it would take their recommendations and try to incorporate them later on in legislation was the sole rights movement forced into, but until the civil rights movement forced them to it would just simply be polite. we can't do any of this. so they found out and they try to cooperate with the a ministration. the pendant that was put into the law when there were set up which made them an independent voice cannot sell rights, it was really important. they should not try to be friendly with some particular administration. their job was to be a watchdog. a watchdog over with the demonstration was doing. and they learned that. and then when kennedy was assassinated and johnson was uprose civil-rights because of that the civil rights act of '64 and '65, actuall
in the missouri and mississippi valleys. hurricanes in louisiana or florida. and other disasters. we've sent our tax dollars, billions of them. and now all of a sudden some are suggesting we should change the rules when we are hit by the first major disaster to hit the new york city region in a very long time. that's not fair. that's not right. and we have argued against it, and i hope my colleagues will defeat the lee amendment. and i also say to my colleagues that this is not just dollars and cents. these are people who care, are waiting, homeowners waiting to rebuild their homes. they haven't moved back in. small business owners who are hanging on by a thread after building a business for 25 years. we know when the hand of god strikes, it's overwhelming for them. take rita from emerald magic lawn care. her company helps local families, schools and businesses with lawn care in the spring and summer and around the holidays they help with decorations and lights. but emerald magic's business was interrupted for many weeks. the client base dried up. rita's business will be in huge trouble. it may
completed. and oxford, mississippi, where i was a writer in residence. so i've toted around a lot of papers for a lot of years. c-span: faulkner does come up in your book. he used to live there in oxford, mississippi. >> guest: yes. c-span: does he--does his writing have any impact on your own? >> guest: well, as a southern writer--i mean, i sort of write mostly about north carolina and what that means. and i think flannery o'connor said it best when she said, 'nobody wants to be stalled on the train tracks when the dixie special comes barreling through.' i mean, his sort of influence is hard to ignore when you're--when you're dealing in that whole territory. c-span: did you make new friends in this endeavor that you still are in touch with? >> guest: oh, yes, oh, yes, many. and the event of a book coming out has sort of helped me rekindle and reconnect with a lot of people. i mean, the woman i spoke with earlier, nellie stone johnson, the labor activist, was in her 80s when i interviewed her and i--my--i'd been writing to her but hadn't get--getting any return correspondence so, you know,
would've had 16 years to figure out of it, but the ordinance would've included mississippi and alabama and think of those two places being without slaves failed to pass in the car, congress with just one delegate from new jersey missed the boat to two elements. jefferson himself wrote that the fate of millions on board had been determined by the absence of this one man and joyce appleby, the great historian commented, saying up to the senate today before limitation on slavery had failed, jefferson backed away from attacking the institution to do something about it increased. the other benchmark that i would like to point out is the louisiana purchase. there is a great opening of the west, the empire for liberty, but would require territory, there is a great debate in congress. should we have slavery there? congress came close to being in it and then pass restrictions that so outraged slaveholders who are already there but they threatened secession, to call in the polling backend. people said if you don't allow slavery, our lives will depreciate in value 50% and as all this was going on
played poker. he had become addicted to cigars when is a cub reporter on the mississippi. of income he contributed his own clouds to the roiling steam. twain bought the long disgusting licorice flavored robes by the bucket full by the barrel for $4, including the bigger. for his guests, he brought them in boxes of 200. he awoke to a three times a night to smoke pretty healthy cigar boys in there, took a few a rogue waves and scattered the favor with the long sweep of his arms. twain had acquired a taste for steam bath in virginia city. and while laboring under bronchitis industries cold of the recently discovered mineral waters, eight miles northwest on the geiger cream, the road between virginia city and steamboat springs, a distance of seven miles. over the first of a long line of nine beautiful columns, there was a house debating. twain likened the jets of hot white steam emitted from fishers in the earth to a steamboats estate tax. they made a boiling, surging noise exactly as a steamboat it. he enjoyed racing eggs in his handkerchief and dipping them in this brings with it with so
. you feel like coming in in okamura clarksdale, mississippi, only five minutes from downtown. >> i know you're from this area, like i said. after ann arbor, you left it mostly lived other places and then you come back to detroit to tell this kind of story. tell me about the things that surprised you about the city, things that she found it were different that maybe he didn't expect for things you found over the same that may be shocking. >> the first thing that surprised me was how much i like living here, to be honest. full disclosure, when i decided to do the piece, i moved away and 93 in my family still lives here. so a year never went by where he didn't come back to visit at least a couple times. the idea of a real extended-stay, planting myself here. i wasn't sure how that would go. i had a life in new york, liked my life there. i kind of thought i would approach it is almost like a regular reporting gig come away with comment, work really hard for legal week, get every time done that needed done and then retreat back to new york for like four weeks. it didn't work out that way. i
ring throughout long-held mississippi. >> let freedom ring. let freedom ring from every state and city. [cheers] [applause] >> he will be able to stand up with all of god's children. black and white and protestant and jewish and all together. [children chanting] [applause] >> i, barack obama, do solemnly swear. >> this weekend presidential inauguration as president obama begins his second term. the official swearing-in ceremony at the right house shortly before noon eastern. it begins with a look back at the president's inaugural address in 2009. other inaugural festivities including the capital luncheon in the parade will start at and be covered on monday on c-span. join the conversation on facebook and facebook.com/c-span and on twitter. >> next, scientific and government health officials discussed the economic impact of drought. researchers say that climate change will affect the magnitude and severity of future droughts. this is one hour. >> we now have had two very international events, one international and domestic. we are now going to move to a time that moves somewhat more slo
that was making them depart. and no one put the stakes more bluntly than the rich mississippi planter, richard thompson archer. it is time, archer said, for all good southerners to stand -- his words -- united in defense of the god-given right to own the african. end quote. the official secession documents just state the same sent independent more polite legal language. now, eight other slave states, who had closer ties with the union, remained within the union, and those are the states colored on the map in front of you in gray and light blue. but four of those states, the ones in gray, arkansas, tennessee, virginia, and north carolina, threatened to follow the states of the lower south out the door, unless the newly elected president explicitly abandoned the platform on which he had just been elected. lincoln, they declared, must guarantee that slavery could in the future expand into all or part of the federal territories, and by the way, not only those territories currently held, but also territories yet to be acquired. and that demand was made with an eye on eventually acquiring cuba, part
. the clerk: mr. whitehouse of rhode island. mr. wicker of mississippi. the vice president: please raise your right hand. the vice president: please raise your right hand. do you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? the group: i do. the vice president: congratulations, senators. [applause] mr. reid: mr. president? the vice president: the majority leader. mr. reid: i note the absence of a quorum and ask the clerk to call the roll. the vice president: the absence of a quorum having been suggested, the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: the vice president: a quorum is present. the majority leader. mr. reid: can we have order, please. the vice president: may we have order in the senate. the majority leader. mr. reid: mr. president, we --
mississippi, west virginia, kentucky, alabama and south carolina. when i first looked at this i was thinking this has to have something to do with being in the southeastern and athletic conference in the ncaa. [laughter] that was my hypothesis. i'm not sure. i will tell you we see california, new jersey, new york a fraction of that at the rate at which they are exporting guns used in crimes. when you do the analysis to see which are most important, you find the most powerful deterrent to exporting the crime having this discretionary permit to purchase system, but even having a nondiscretionary permit process where you have to show up at a law enforcement agency and reduce export rates by 55% statistically significant important for the policies that we are talking about now being considered is the private sales regulation reduce divergent across state lines by 30%. and by the similar magnitude mandatory testing and loss reporting also decrease exporting of crime guns. something we haven't talked about is bands of what some people call junk guns that are poorly made handguns that are shown as
mississippi. he led this investigation and ultimately resulted in buddies conviction. after an epic 2-month trial and a city where people said you will never get people to convict buddy cianci, a city where he went to prison with 67 percent of the voters still thinking he had done a good job in the value is guilty. and when he was sentenced by the judge, the judge talked about how he was really two people, dr. jekyll and mr. hyde. and buddy, in his own way, said, well, you know, privately to a friend later, how come i didn't get to f paychecks. well, convicted of racketeering conspiracy, being kind of in knowing about it but not actually being physically involved in the underlying acts. and buddy kind of friend it as what did i do? was convicted of being the mayor some of the jurors a spoke to felt otherwise, that he was a guy who knew how to keep himself insulated, kind of like a mob boss that he had once prosecuted, ironically. anti was able to stay out of the direct line, but he knew everything was going on. the kind of guy one juror told me, who know how many rolls of toilet paper there
. my wife and i took her first family vacation to kalina, illinois, a cozy mississippi river town, were on the main strip they are rediscovered a rare book shop anywhere bookshop i found this nondescript container of old newspapers. picked one up and started reading it is april 21st 1865 "new york times." i was reading about abraham lincoln's assassination and reward for the capture of his conspirators. appleman triggered an intense passion and enthusiasm for history that i previously never had. for the next five years it became this journey of collecting of newspapers because i'm tucked away in the midwest. i don't have convenient access to a lot of wonderful archives on the east coast. i don't have access to a lot of the original that are found in the libraries and institutions across the country. so i made it a point to try and collect fees because much like any other historical collectible , they are available for sale or purchase. if any of you have seen american pickers on the history channel, i would say it's much like that. i equate myself to american pickers, but more along the
lips. one sky cynthiana pollutions claimed their majesty and the mississippi worked their way to the sea. think the work of our hands we been stealing two bridges, finishing one more report for the boss on time, stitching another wonder uniform. the first brushstroke of a portrait for the last four and the freedom tower jutting into the sky that yields to a resilient. one sky toward which we sometimes lift our eyes tired from work, sunday's cnet the web they are of our lives. some days giving thanks for a love that loves you back. sometimes praising another who knew how to give order for giving a father couldn't give what he wanted. we had home through the glass of rain per week of snow for the palm brush the dust, but always, always home, always under one sky, our sky and always 1,000,002nd senate term tapping on every rooftop in every window of one country, all of this facing the stars, hope a new constellation, waiting for us to not do, waiting for us to name it together. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, it is now my privilege to introduce reverend dr. luis deleon to del
to the booming cotton south, alabama, mississippi, louisiana. this book tries to tell the story out that experience for those individuals. what i was able to do, and what is really kind of fun, i think, about the book is readers can go on a journey with eric crow, studying at the hotel where he stayed in richmond, where he woke up that morning, picked up richmond newspapers and was astonished to see advertised there in the upper corner, people for sale. it was something he had never experienced before. richmond was the first southern city he visited. >> host: is that what got him to go to the walk to selma. >> guest: he was prime for that. when he was in new york city he bought a copy of harriet beecher stowe's uncle tom's cabin that had just been released in 1852, and he read the novel and was harrowed by its contents. its horrified him, this story of american slavery, and he was particularly attracted to the slave trade. the commercial aspect of slavery. the selling of humans, one to another. and he was determined when he got a southern city to witness this aspect of slavery himse
, mississippi, so tavistock magical enough, we can go to three. the clip does change the type of gun. it dramatically change that. it's a good comprehensive background checks for criminal dignity would be essential to anything on the loophole. obviously filler pieces you can do. usually people think the executive order is that the president would sign. direct the attorney general as a measure of each u.s. attorney. we at the u.s. attorney position in chicago. it's opened up. you compare to others, like the other one. they should be measured and have to report it within the executive authority they do get prosecuted. i put the prosecution to a standard as part of the executive authority of a president can do. >> i want to share with the audience that kind of passion and i'm sure many of you are aware of it. let me just do something -- how many of you have ever fired a gun? more than i would've expected. how many of you own a gun? fewer obviously. how many of you feel strongly about my right to own a gun without conditions? a few. >> let me share stand krystal, who was a special forces
and flooding the mississippi river was inevitable. i visited several towns along the mississippi back then including quincy, illinois. then-senator barack obama and i came to quincy and pitched in filling sandbags with thousands of other volunteers. we worked through father's day to help mitigate the on coming flood, but it still came and there was serious damage. just like the people in new york and new jersey, these people did everything they could before and after and during the storm to save their homes, businesses and lives of their loved ones, but the magnitude of our 2008 storm was too big for local and state governments to handle. the magnitude of the flood, just like hurricane sandy, required action from congress and the federal government. we passed a supplemental appropriations bill for illinois and the midwest in 2008. that aid was essential to helping in our state the victims of that flood. i've served in congress for over 20 years and every time -- every time -- some section of our nation has been victimized by a disaster, we've come together as an american family to hel
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